from the library: Reading Challenge

It’s reading challenge time!

The first thing you need to do is make a reading tracker, so you can track the genres you read over the next month.

You’re going to need: Paper, a pen or pencil, a straight edge (a ruler if you have one)

I made two sample reading trackers: one is a 3×4 tracker and the other is a 3×13 tracker.

3×4 tracker and 3×13 tracker

You want to include the following genres on your reading challenge tracker: historical fiction, mystery, science fiction, fantasy, realistic fiction, autobiography, biography, informative non-fiction, adventure, newspaper article, poetry, graphic novel

Our reading challenge is officially starting today. Anything you’ve read since Friday, March 13th counts towards your reading challenge. We’ll wrap up our reading challenge on Friday, May 1st.

When you finish your challenge, take a picture of your tracker and email it to me at mbarker@rvaschools.net. The student who reads the most genres, WINS! If we have multiple winners, I’ll post a list of the students who completed the challenge and then draw one name to be the prize winner.

EXTRA CHALLENGE: Have an adult in your home accept (and hopefully) complete the challenge too!

You are welcome to email me to let me know how the challenge is going, if you have a question, or if you need help finding a book that fits one of the genres.

Here are a few places to find some of the genres mentioned:

Junior Library Guild

Audible Stories

Poetry Foundation

Mrs. El Koubi’s daily touchpoints

richmond.com (for newspaper articles)

Richmond Free Press (for newspaper articles)

Time for Kids (sign up for free access to Time Magazine for Kids)

Time for Kids is offering access to its digital issues through the end of the school year.

Unprecedented

Perhaps unprecedented will be the word of the year for 2020. Or social distancing.

The word unprecedented seems both accurate and inadequate.

On Monday the governor ordered the closure of schools for the rest of the year. It wasn’t a surprise, but it certainly is a shock to the system.

And the shocks keep coming at unexpected times. While brushing my teeth, I remember that the 5th graders won’t be able to finish their podcasts. While loading the dishwasher, I remember that the 2nd graders won’t finish the books they were working on about their year working in the Beaver Garden. It seems over but not over as we all find some way to cobble together learning experiences for our students knowing that those experiences and opportunities need to be equitable for all students who may or may not have reliable technology or who may or may not have support from adults at home.

So we do what we can while we wait for guidance from our superintendent (who, I think, is doing a remarkable job keeping families and teachers updated on what’s going on) and the VDOE.

My school’s faculty is supposed to be getting together online this afternoon. I’m looking forward to that as well as the possibility of a teacher car parade along the school’s bus route Friday.

In the meantime, I’m taking the time to learn about teaching tools that I didn’t have time to explore during the school year, trying to offer short lessons for students who may want a distraction or who may want to see their old librarian’s face, and doing my best to cobble together come coherent learning for my own 4th grader.